CKD-EPI creatinine equation (2009)
The CKD-EPI creatinine equation is based on the same four variables as the MDRD Study equation, but uses a 2-slope spline to model the relationship between estimated GFR and serum creatinine, and a different relationship for age, sex and race. The equation was reported to perform better and with less bias than the MDRD Study equation, especially in patients with higher GFR. This results in reduced misclassification of CKD.
Research authors: Levey AS, Stevens LA, Schmid CH, Zhang YL, Castro AF, Feldman HI, Kusek JW, Eggers P, Van Lente F, Greene T, and Coresh J.
Details Custom formula Study characteristics Files & References
★★★★
Model author
Model ID
413
Version
1.15
Revision date
2018-05-30
Specialty
MeSH terms
  • Glomerular Filtration Rate
  • Kidney Function Tests
  • Kidney Failure
  • Model type
    Custom model (Conditional)
    Status
    public
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    Condition Formula

    Additional information

    The CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation was developed in an effort to create a more precise formula to estimate glomerular filtrate rate (GFR) from serum creatinine and other readily available clinical parameters, especially at when actual GFR is >60 mL/min per 1.73m2.

    Researchers pooled data from multiple studies to develop and validate this new equation. They randomly divided 10 studies which included 8254 participants, into separate data sets for development and internal validation. 16 additional studies, which included 3896 participants, were used for external validation.

    The CKD-EPI equation performed better than the MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study) equation, especially at higher GFR, with less bias and greater accuracy. When looking at NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) data, the median estimated GFR was 94.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 vs. 85.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was 11.5% versus 13.1%.


    References:

    The CKD-EPI was derived and validated by Levey et al. A New Equation to Estimate Glomerular Filtration Rate. Ann Intern Med. 2009;150:604-612.
    View Abstract

    Study Population

    Total population size: 5504
    Males: {{ model.numberOfMales }}
    Females: {{ model.numberOfFemales }}

    Continuous characteristics

    Name Mean SD Unit
    Height 170 10 cm
    Weight 82 20 kg
    Body mass index 28 6 kg/m2
    Body surface area 1.93 0.20 m2
    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 68 40 ml/min per 1.73 m2
    Serum creatinine level 146 106 micromol/l
    Serum creatinine 1.65 1.20 mg/dl

    Categorical characteristics

    Name Subset / Group Nr. of patients
    Age <40 years 2058
    41-65 years 2751
    66-70 years 476
    71-75 years 150
    76-80 years 41
    >80 years 28
    Race Black 1728
    Hispanic 247
    Asian 62
    White and other 3467
    Kidney donor Yes 694
    No 4810
    Transplant recipient Yes 241
    No 5263
    Diabetes Yes 1581
    No 3923

    Related files

    Supporting Publications

    Estimated GFR:
    ...
    ml/min/1.73m2

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    Result
    Note
    Notes are only visible in the result download and will not be saved by Evidencio

    Estimated GFR: ml/min/1.73m2

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    Outcome stratification

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    Conditional information

    Result interpretation

    The CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation was developed in an effort to create a more precise formula to estimate glomerular filtrate rate (GFR) from serum creatinine and other readily available clinical parameters, especially at when actual GFR is >60 mL/min per 1.73m2.

    Researchers pooled data from multiple studies to develop and validate this new equation. They randomly divided 10 studies which included 8254 participants, into separate data sets for development and internal validation. 16 additional studies, which included 3896 participants, were used for external validation.

    The CKD-EPI equation performed better than the MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study) equation, especially at higher GFR, with less bias and greater accuracy. When looking at NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) data, the median estimated GFR was 94.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 vs. 85.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was 11.5% versus 13.1%.

    {{ file.classification }}

    Calculations alone should never dictate patient care, and are no substitute for professional judgement. See our full disclaimer.

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